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Register for Camp

Overall Camp Medical Program


The medical program is designed to impart self-management skills, which can lead to a longer and healthier life. All cabins are fully enclosed to accommodate eight to eleven youth and a trained counselor. Attendance at these sessions is restricted to youth and teens with insulin-dependent diabetes. All sessions are led by a physician with experience working with children and young adults with type 1 diabetes, and a team of physicians and nurses. Under the watchful eyes of the medical staff, campers are encouraged to be involved with their own diabetes care. Each year at camp, many children learn to give themselves insulin injections, how to handle special occasions, try an insulin pump and about the importance of diet and exercise.




Youth & Teen Camp Sessions


Days are a mix of cabin-group based activities and free-choice periods. Younger children spend the majority of the time with their cabin-mates while older campers have a greater amount of choice in their activities, although they are supervised at all times. Campers report that while they enjoy the activities, they particularly value the chance to get to know other kids with diabetes. Watching other campers check their blood sugars, take their insulin, deal with high and low blood sugars and talking with them about how they handle their diabetes in terms of school, athletics, peers and families are some of the most powerful learning opportunities which occur during camp.




Youth & Teen Session Transportation


Transportation to and from camp is provided for all youth and teen sessions free of charge and is encourage, as the bonds start at while on the bus with your cabin. The bus stop is at the Don Day Neighborhood Center located at 14501 Live Oak Avenue Fontana, CA 92337. This is located near the intersection of Interstates 10 and 15. Families must provide their own transportation for all family camp sessions.




Family Camp Sessions


Because Diabetes is a condition impacting the entire family, Diabetes Camping and Educational Services, Inc. program enables families to learn about diabetes and share common experiences with other families in a fun and supportive environment. Our top notch program includes workshops on diabetes, parenting issues for adults, stress management, and activities for the whole family.




Family Camp Medical Staff


There is on-site Medical Staff throughout the entire session. All meals and snacks are carefully planned and provided. Family camps begin at lunch, run for three (3) nights, and conclude after breakfast on the final day. Generally, approximately two families, depending on each of their sizes, share a cabin during family camps.




Transition Family Camp Session


Going away for the first time to a sleep-away camp can be challenging for any child. It is even more challenging for a child with diabetes. To assist in helping the parent and child adjust to the experiences at Camp Conrad Chinnock, a Transition Family Camp is available for children 7 to 12 years old and their families. Transition Family Camp immediately precedes "The first Youth Session" for the same age group. It begins Saturday morning and ends after breakfast on Monday. The Youth Session begins the same day as the Transition Family Camp ends. Ideally, the child with diabetes will stay for the Youth Session if the child, parent(s), and camp staff feel it is suitable for the child. As with the other family camps, families will share a cabin. For activities, meals, snacks, and events, the children with diabetes will be in "cabin" groups by age with a cabin counselor. This cabin counselor ideally would be the same counselor the child would have during their Youth Session. This unique opportunity enables the child and family to understand how diabetes is managed at camp, the activities available, and develop a relationship with cabin counselors and staff. The weekend may even offer a sleep-over in the game lodge with cabin counselors! Parents are able to sleep in the cabin while the child with diabetes is under the watchful eye of the cabin counselor and camp staff. Camp staff even take care of testing blood sugars in the middle of the night and before breakfast! When registering for this session, please also sign-up the child with diabetes in "The first Youth Session". If after attending the Transition Family Camp the child is not suitable, the family can cancel registration without penalty.




Counselor In Training (CIT) Program


The Leadership Training Program is open to teenagers ages 17 to 19, with or without diabetes, has an application process. Qualifications we look for in our counselors in training are teens that can demonstrate a level of maturity that enables them to assume responsibility and develop strong leadership skills. The applicant must demonstrate an interest in camping and show the ability to learn and work with diabetic children. Being a healthy role-model for children with diabetes is critical! Young leaders are given an opportunity to learn and explore group dynamics, human development, communications skills, recreational programming, and organization. The objective of this two-year program is to build a strong counseling staff for our program and promote leadership in our communities and at camp. All first-year applicants complete an application with two reference forms. Responsibilities in the first year will include learning camp operations, developmental needs of children, how to lead a group, and other key components of a camp staff member. You may assist in the kitchen, help at the pool, and work in crafts or the store. Focus will be on basic staff and leadership skills.




Family Winter Camp


Because Diabetes is a condition impacting the entire family, Diabetes Camping and Educational Services, and the PADRE Foundation program enables families to learn about diabetes and share common experiences with other families in a fun and supportive environment. Our top-notch program includes workshops on diabetes, parenting issues for adults, stress management, and activities for the whole family. Medical staff is on-site throughout the entire session. All meals and snacks are carefully planned and provided. Family Winter Camp begin at lunch, run for three (3) nights, and conclude after breakfast on the final day. Generally, approximately two families, depending on each of their sizes, share a cabin during family camps. A Quick Glimps: What happens on the first day of camp? You will arrive between 11:00a.m. and 12:30p.m. on Saturday. Lunch will be at 1:00p.m. We will have an orientation fol­lowed by family recrea­tion activities, introductions and games, and dinner. After dinner, staff will play a game with the kids while the parents enjoy a social hour with desserts and beverages. The night ends with a fun and en­tertaining campfire and snack. I still owe camp fees or haven’t paid money for the camp store. Can I bring the money to check-in? All fees must be paid by 10 days before camp unless alternative ar­rangements have been made through the ad­ministrative office. Con­ tact the office if you have questions regard­ing your balance or store account. What kind of weather can we expect? Generally, the tempera­tures are brisk during the day and into the 10s and 20s at night... Fun in the snow!?! Camp is at 6,800 feet, so listen to snow reports for the San Bernardino Mountains at or below that level. Temperatures may range between 20 and 50 degrees. For cur­rent weather conditions, go to http://www.bensweather.com What time do we check -in? Check-in is between 11:00a.m. and 12:30p.m. and activities begin thereafter. What time do we leave? About 10:00a.m. on the last day (Monday). A family member has special needs. How can they be accommodated? If a family member needs additional assis­tance, you must notify the administrative office at least two weeks prior to the camp. If the per­ son may only eat certain foods (e.g., celiac, lactose intolerant, etc.), those unique foods will need to be brought to camp; this is coordinated­ with the Food Service Manager. Serious aller­gies, physical limitations, and developmental disa­bilities need prior notifi­cation to enable each per­ son to enjoy camp to their potential. What is the process at check-in? At check-in, a representa­tive will let you know who you will be sharing a cab­ in with and take your fam­ily on a camp tour if it’s your first time. While at check-in, you can make a deposit for your family's camp store account to pay for a camp photo and oth­er incidentals at the camp store. Check-in occurs in the dining hall. Please park in the parking lot, leave your items in the car, and walk towards the dining hall. Just look for the signs! More information will be given shortly after you register.




Teen Winter Camp


Teen Winter Camp features team-building challenges, discussions regarding diabetes and life as a teenager, snow sledding, campfires, snacks, good company, snow fights, games, and a variety of opportunities for personal growth. Anyone attending the weekend must bring their own diabetes supplies and medications. Medical staff will be on-site and monitoring their diabetes control throughout the weekend.




Teen Winter Camp Bring A Buddy


During Teen Winter Camp, campers with diabetes can share their camp and diabetes experiences by inviting a friend or sibling without diabetes to attend camp for the weekend. The friend or sibling must pay the fee and complete all necessary registration information. To be placed in the same cabin, the campers must be of the same gender and within one year of age between each other.




About Camp and the National Forest


Camp Conrad-Chinnock is operated under special use permit with the San Bernardino National Forest. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, Camp Conrad-Chinnock is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs). To file a complaint of discrimination: write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.





General Information

Type the camper's age into the search bar to find the right session.

 

Our 2021 Dates will be released shortly!  

Camp Activities

Program availability varies by age group, but typical activities include:

  • Age-appropriate arts and crafts activities.

  • Time in the pool during the day and night.

  • Canoeing.

  • Casual and formal discussions about how diabetes impacts the lives of youth with diabetes.

  • Archery and carnivals.

  • Dances and campfires.

  • Use of the 35-foot 'Activity Adventure Tower' with rock climbing, rappelling, the 'vertical playpen', and high-rope element.

  • Mountain biking.

  • Hikes.

  • Sleeping in the outdoors.

Structured times are designated for medical and dietary education programs as well as diabetes management, meals, and rest.

Overall Camp Medical Program


The medical program is designed to impart self-management skills, which can lead to a longer and healthier life. All cabins are fully enclosed to accommodate eight to eleven youth and a trained counselor. Attendance at these sessions is restricted to youth and teens with insulin-dependent diabetes. All sessions are led by a physician with experience working with children and young adults with type 1 diabetes, and a team of physicians and nurses. Under the watchful eyes of the medical staff, campers are encouraged to be involved with their own diabetes care. Each year at camp, many children learn to give themselves insulin injections, how to handle special occasions, try an insulin pump and about the importance of diet and exercise.




Youth & Teen Camp Sessions


Days are a mix of cabin-group based activities and free-choice periods. Younger children spend the majority of the time with their cabin-mates while older campers have a greater amount of choice in their activities, although they are supervised at all times. Campers report that while they enjoy the activities, they particularly value the chance to get to know other kids with diabetes. Watching other campers check their blood sugars, take their insulin, deal with high and low blood sugars and talking with them about how they handle their diabetes in terms of school, athletics, peers and families are some of the most powerful learning opportunities which occur during camp.




Youth & Teen Session Transportation


Transportation to and from camp is provided for all youth and teen sessions free of charge and is encourage, as the bonds start at while on the bus with your cabin. The bus stop is at the Don Day Neighborhood Center located at 14501 Live Oak Avenue Fontana, CA 92337. This is located near the intersection of Interstates 10 and 15. Families must provide their own transportation for all family camp sessions.




Family Camp Sessions


Because Diabetes is a condition impacting the entire family, Diabetes Camping and Educational Services, Inc. program enables families to learn about diabetes and share common experiences with other families in a fun and supportive environment. Our top notch program includes workshops on diabetes, parenting issues for adults, stress management, and activities for the whole family.




Family Camp Medical Staff


There is on-site Medical Staff throughout the entire session. All meals and snacks are carefully planned and provided. Family camps begin at lunch, run for three (3) nights, and conclude after breakfast on the final day. Generally, approximately two families, depending on each of their sizes, share a cabin during family camps.




Transition Family Camp Session


Going away for the first time to a sleep-away camp can be challenging for any child. It is even more challenging for a child with diabetes. To assist in helping the parent and child adjust to the experiences at Camp Conrad Chinnock, a Transition Family Camp is available for children 7 to 12 years old and their families. Transition Family Camp immediately precedes "The first Youth Session" for the same age group. It begins Saturday morning and ends after breakfast on Monday. The Youth Session begins the same day as the Transition Family Camp ends. Ideally, the child with diabetes will stay for the Youth Session if the child, parent(s), and camp staff feel it is suitable for the child. As with the other family camps, families will share a cabin. For activities, meals, snacks, and events, the children with diabetes will be in "cabin" groups by age with a cabin counselor. This cabin counselor ideally would be the same counselor the child would have during their Youth Session. This unique opportunity enables the child and family to understand how diabetes is managed at camp, the activities available, and develop a relationship with cabin counselors and staff. The weekend may even offer a sleep-over in the game lodge with cabin counselors! Parents are able to sleep in the cabin while the child with diabetes is under the watchful eye of the cabin counselor and camp staff. Camp staff even take care of testing blood sugars in the middle of the night and before breakfast! When registering for this session, please also sign-up the child with diabetes in "The first Youth Session". If after attending the Transition Family Camp the child is not suitable, the family can cancel registration without penalty.




Counselor In Training (CIT) Program


The Leadership Training Program is open to teenagers ages 17 to 19, with or without diabetes, has an application process. Qualifications we look for in our counselors in training are teens that can demonstrate a level of maturity that enables them to assume responsibility and develop strong leadership skills. The applicant must demonstrate an interest in camping and show the ability to learn and work with diabetic children. Being a healthy role-model for children with diabetes is critical! Young leaders are given an opportunity to learn and explore group dynamics, human development, communications skills, recreational programming, and organization. The objective of this two-year program is to build a strong counseling staff for our program and promote leadership in our communities and at camp. All first-year applicants complete an application with two reference forms. Responsibilities in the first year will include learning camp operations, developmental needs of children, how to lead a group, and other key components of a camp staff member. You may assist in the kitchen, help at the pool, and work in crafts or the store. Focus will be on basic staff and leadership skills.




Family Winter Camp


Because Diabetes is a condition impacting the entire family, Diabetes Camping and Educational Services, and the PADRE Foundation program enables families to learn about diabetes and share common experiences with other families in a fun and supportive environment. Our top-notch program includes workshops on diabetes, parenting issues for adults, stress management, and activities for the whole family. Medical staff is on-site throughout the entire session. All meals and snacks are carefully planned and provided. Family Winter Camp begin at lunch, run for three (3) nights, and conclude after breakfast on the final day. Generally, approximately two families, depending on each of their sizes, share a cabin during family camps. A Quick Glimps: What happens on the first day of camp? You will arrive between 11:00a.m. and 12:30p.m. on Saturday. Lunch will be at 1:00p.m. We will have an orientation fol­lowed by family recrea­tion activities, introductions and games, and dinner. After dinner, staff will play a game with the kids while the parents enjoy a social hour with desserts and beverages. The night ends with a fun and en­tertaining campfire and snack. I still owe camp fees or haven’t paid money for the camp store. Can I bring the money to check-in? All fees must be paid by 10 days before camp unless alternative ar­rangements have been made through the ad­ministrative office. Con­ tact the office if you have questions regard­ing your balance or store account. What kind of weather can we expect? Generally, the tempera­tures are brisk during the day and into the 10s and 20s at night... Fun in the snow!?! Camp is at 6,800 feet, so listen to snow reports for the San Bernardino Mountains at or below that level. Temperatures may range between 20 and 50 degrees. For cur­rent weather conditions, go to http://www.bensweather.com What time do we check -in? Check-in is between 11:00a.m. and 12:30p.m. and activities begin thereafter. What time do we leave? About 10:00a.m. on the last day (Monday). A family member has special needs. How can they be accommodated? If a family member needs additional assis­tance, you must notify the administrative office at least two weeks prior to the camp. If the per­ son may only eat certain foods (e.g., celiac, lactose intolerant, etc.), those unique foods will need to be brought to camp; this is coordinated­ with the Food Service Manager. Serious aller­gies, physical limitations, and developmental disa­bilities need prior notifi­cation to enable each per­ son to enjoy camp to their potential. What is the process at check-in? At check-in, a representa­tive will let you know who you will be sharing a cab­ in with and take your fam­ily on a camp tour if it’s your first time. While at check-in, you can make a deposit for your family's camp store account to pay for a camp photo and oth­er incidentals at the camp store. Check-in occurs in the dining hall. Please park in the parking lot, leave your items in the car, and walk towards the dining hall. Just look for the signs! More information will be given shortly after you register.




Teen Winter Camp


Teen Winter Camp features team-building challenges, discussions regarding diabetes and life as a teenager, snow sledding, campfires, snacks, good company, snow fights, games, and a variety of opportunities for personal growth. Anyone attending the weekend must bring their own diabetes supplies and medications. Medical staff will be on-site and monitoring their diabetes control throughout the weekend.




Teen Winter Camp Bring A Buddy


During Teen Winter Camp, campers with diabetes can share their camp and diabetes experiences by inviting a friend or sibling without diabetes to attend camp for the weekend. The friend or sibling must pay the fee and complete all necessary registration information. To be placed in the same cabin, the campers must be of the same gender and within one year of age between each other.




About Camp and the National Forest


Camp Conrad-Chinnock is operated under special use permit with the San Bernardino National Forest. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, Camp Conrad-Chinnock is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs). To file a complaint of discrimination: write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.





Los Angeles Office

Phone

(310) 751-3057 Office

(909) 752-5354 Fax

Diabetes Camping and Educational Services

 12045 E. Waterfront Dr.

Playa Vista, CA 90094

Email

Orange County Office

Diabetes Camping and Educational Services

 2400 E. Katella Ave., Suite 800

Anaheim, CA 92806

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